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NEC decides Corbyn on the Ballot as current leader - but voting rights restricted

 

Robert Peston on Facebook after the NEC decision on who can vote in the Leadership Election
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Even by Labour's recent history of giving shambles a good name, today's meeting of the ruling NEC takes the biscuit. 

 

943820_1543247409333332_5617189529970431314_n.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Because at the end of the meeting, after a couple of pro-Corbyn members had left, and Corbyn himself had gone, a vote was taken on a motion not on the agenda, to exclude from the leadership vote anyone who joined the party in the past six months. So the 130,000 who signed up since Brexit, most of whom are thought to be Corbyn supporters, will be unable to vote. 

Now whatever you think of Corbyn, this looks and smells like gerrymandering by his opponents. 

Corbyn will definitely attempt to get the vote over-turned. And he may resort to the law, since Labour's website made clear that membership bought a vote.

As for those who joined since January, they will be revolting. 

That said, if anyone wants to take part in the election, they now have two days to pay £25 and become a registered supporter. 

Which is the first example of the much feared post-Brexit inflation, since till today it cost just £3 to be such a voting supporter.

Even by Labour's recent history of giving shambles a good name, today's meeting of the ruling NEC takes the biscuit. 

Because at the end of the meeting, after a couple of pro-Corbyn members had left, and Corbyn himself had gone, a vote was taken on a motion not on the agenda, to exclude from the leadership vote anyone who joined the party in the past six months. So the 130,000 who signed up since Brexit, most of whom are thought to be Corbyn supporters, will be unable to vote. 

Now whatever you think of Corbyn, this looks and smells like gerrymandering by his opponents. 

Corbyn will definitely attempt to get the vote over-turned. And he may resort to the law, since Labour's website made clear that membership bought a vote.

As for those who joined since January, they will be revolting. 

That said, if anyone wants to take part in the election, they now have two days to pay £25 and become a registered supporter. 

Which is the first example of the much feared post-Brexit inflation, since till today it cost just £3 to be such a voting supporter.

 

INFORMATION FROM TWITTER

 

Jamie (@GreenJamieS)
Want to vote in the Labour leadership election? Join Unite Community for £2 per month before August 8th unitetheunion.org/growing-our-un… #LabourNEC

 

Aaron Bastani (@AaronBastani)
Peston on today's NEC meeting: "shambles" "gerrymandering".

Honest account. pic.twitter.com/miWoP6bAnc

 

Éoin (@LabourEoin)
Labour in legal hot water. They've accepted £4.5 million in new member fees in last 2 wks on promise they could vote pic.twitter.com/7k69Z34vWS

 

Colin Henderson (@hendersonlegal_)
You really couldn't make up the #LabourNEC banning new members' votes. Luckily my Union has a way round. Join here:
unitetheunion.org/campaigning/un…

 

 

Been sent this from Labour site 2wks ago. Putting politics aside, the term change creates a strong case for refunds.

Front page of the Times tomorrow, describing it as a deliberate tactic to reduce Corbyn's support

 

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commented 2016-07-16 06:21:23 +0100
I quote: “For PR professional Smith, political stance is nothing to do with personal belief, it is to do with brand positioning. On Channel 4 News last night, an incredulous Michael Crick pointed out that the “soft left” Smith had previously given interviews supporting PFI and privatisation in the health service. He also strongly supported Blair’s city academies.”

It’s PR people who are destroying the party. They see politics as a marketing exercise with membership and electorate as customers, and will work for the highest bidders.
commented 2016-07-15 22:15:40 +0100
For the benefit of anyone else reading the blog and comments on Owen Smith – take a moment to research his background. His father, historian Dai Smith who has chronicled the history of the South Wales miners. His early mentor in Labour politics Hywel Francis, son of Dai Francis Welsh NUM chair and long standing member of CPGB. Another mentor Kim Howels, ex-Labour minister and strike activist in the 80’s. A real socialist pedigree, a tradition of fighting for equality and a tradition of aspiration to make a difference NOT a satisfaction to condem from the sidelines powerless to affect change. Real people, real professionals making a real difference to real people’s lives. Let’s not throw it away.
commented 2016-07-15 20:21:46 +0100
That’s yer man.
He’s been around a bit but he’s never been a lobbyist for a major drug company, arguing for privatisation of the NHS, like, er, O Smith.
Another “career” politician – but of the other tendency.
commented 2016-07-15 16:29:45 +0100
Gosh is that THE Craig Murray who was Amdassador to Uzbekistan for two whole years! Must be true then.
He’s clearly never sought a career in the FCO or politics.
commented 2016-07-15 06:21:38 +0100
We have a convenient example of the other sort of CAREER politician in the form of Owen Smith

https://www.craigmurray.org.uk/archives/2016/07/entirely-fake-owen-smith/

The difference couldn’t be clearer.
commented 2016-07-14 19:26:37 +0100
May I remind everyone of the Blog Rules

1. Be polite & courteous to everyone.
2. Be civil. No personal attacks.
3. 1 account per person. Please add your first and surname to posts.
4. Discuss the issue and respect the person with a different view.
5. No spam. No personal disrespectful comments. No trolling.
6. Find ways of stating what we will do – be positive.

We are all part of the same CLP!

RM CLP Secretary
commented 2016-07-14 17:13:50 +0100
PS from below:
I forgot the record breaking low expense claims! Not a duck-house in sight!

Seems like a lot of money men are plotting and scheming as we speak. So-called “donors” obviously see their contribution as conditional and will award them like punters at the bookies, or remove them if they aren’t getting what they want. This should not be happening. Offering to finance legal fight against the NEC and their Corbyn decision? Appalling!
I wonder about Tom Watson and his £200k. Explains his slightly obscure manoeuvres and his shifty expression?
commented 2016-07-14 17:02:13 +0100
“Mr Corbyn has been an MP since 1983. That’s quite a CAREER.”
True but he has been doggedly working away for his constituents and now his party members – without striving for personal profit or lobbying for external agencies with other agendas. No gravy train, revolving door or seats on boards for him. That’s very different from many of the others who see “career” in a very differemnt light, in ways we which all know.
commented 2016-07-14 16:24:52 +0100
Whatever position people may have on Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, I find it hard to believe that the NEC thought fit to introduce rule changes that completely undermine the principles of democracy and decency. It is possible to argue a case that voting eligibility should be restricted to those who joined, in good faith, before the end of 25th June. Up until then, there was no question of a leadership election and there can be no claims that new members joined so that they could vote for, or against Jeremy Corbyn. They paid their money believing what the Party’s website, and existing members – including me – were telling them, which was that the Party welcomed them, would value them, and hoped that they would play an active role in the party. Excluding members who joined during this period (unless of course they can be fleeced for an additional £25) is both irrational and immoral.
Personally, I would feel much happier if all members of the party, including those who joined after 25th June, were declared eligible to vote, although I can see that they could reasonably be asked why, if they are Labour supporters, did they not join beforehand?
As I said, I am against the decision that has been taken on moral and democratic grounds, but I do not think it will make a big difference to the result. Our CLP was supportive of Corbyn’s candidacy last year, before the influx of new members and, I think I am correct in saying that the bulk of our new members joined us in the first few months after his election. Most of these joined because they were inspired by the ideas he represents and are likely to strengthen his position.
commented 2016-07-14 16:21:40 +0100
Mr Corbyn has been an MP since 1983. That’s quite a CAREER. But as he is such an amateur then nobody could mistake him for being PROFESSIONAL. So real people with real skills and being paid for it and held closely to account – obviously not at all professional. How unthinkable that the highest calibre of Labour members should rise through the ranks to represent us in parliament and hopefully one day (although seemingly less likely everyday) represent the UK in the wider world. A bit of swearing and addressing meetings by telling people only what they want to hear – oh yes, what an inspiration. Labour landslide victory here we come (cuckoo)
commented 2016-07-14 12:39:32 +0100
We don’t want “professional” politicians – we want real people, but yes – with real skills and experience.
commented 2016-07-14 12:22:41 +0100
Of course real people! I always check my doctor, bank manager or children’s headteachers advice against their sense of humour because professionalism is so insignificant a quality. And of course heaven forbid a shadow chancellor should dirty himself by appearing professional when all he wants the nation to do is trust him with their economic stability. It seems Labour could be reduced from political party, to pressure group to stand up comedy duo quicker than we all thought. But that’s OK so long as they’re real people (as opposed to cardboard cut outs, mannequins or what precisely?)
commented 2016-07-14 07:09:12 +0100
From Facebook this morning:

“Labour MPs smearing ordinary members as violent thugs and a rabble was the same tactics used to attack Miners 84 and fans at Hillsborough”

Yes the failed undemocratic coup is desperately scraping the bottom of the barrel.
commented 2016-07-14 06:53:20 +0100
“people who love the Labour Party and have stuck with it through thick and thin are afraid.”
Afraid of the democratic process it seems. Remember he got a majority from the older members (such as myself “stuck with it through thick and thin”) without the contribution from the new.
Nothing to stop the antis campaigning against Corbyn but they have to take note of the majority of the party and do it in a civilised and democratic way – not via a pathetically choreographed coup mis-managed by over-paid PR firms; this is Britain not a pseudo-democratic dictatorship.
“Shadow chancellor’s unprofessional conduct, sorry, jokes (because that definition makes all the difference).” We don’t want “professionals”, we want real people on the job.
commented 2016-07-13 22:40:06 +0100
LOL. You are funny. Maybe Lord Lucan threw the brick or Princess Diana or Michael Jackson? The endless conspiracy theories are much funnier than the shadow chancellor’s unprofessional conduct, sorry, jokes (because that definition makes all the difference). Don’t worry, when Corbyn and his Momentum pack have turned the Labour Party into a ‘movement’ doomed forever to protest OUTSIDE Parliament they’ll all be happy gnawing over the old bones of plots and conspiracy theories untroubled by the responsibilities of power and government.
That’s the very reason why people who love the Labour Party and have stuck with it through thick and thin are afraid.
commented 2016-07-13 21:56:11 +0100
The anti Corbyn faction do seem to be desperate:
“Would it not be easier,” Bertholt Brecht once wrote. “To dissolve the people and elect another?”
That is what they are doing – fighting the democratic vote of the membership, banning CLP meetings, altering the terms of membership.
The NEC couldn’t quite reject Corbyn. It would have been the end of the labour party, a totally undemocratic take over, too blatant a victory for the chicken coup. Instead they have gone subversive – dodging and weaving.
We want our party back!

NB new members losing their voting rights should ask for their money back. There are enough old members to give Corbyn a majority anyway.

As for John mcdonnell’s joke – quite funny I thought! We are all grown ups here! Perhaps.

Who knows who threw the brick? I’d put money on it being a journalist. Even the BBC fakes the news – remember Kuensberg and the on-screen resignation?

As for leadership – Corbyn seems to be last man standing – wholly down to strength of purpose and cool calm demeanour under fire. His status grows by the day.
Even the media are beginning to ease up and starting to think about things seriously. Not poor old Polly Toynbee – she seems to be having some sort of breakdown- what is it about Corbyn that so alarms some people? I can’t see it.
commented 2016-07-13 11:02:55 +0100
And is this Jeremy Corbyn’s new way of politics? MP’s verbally intimidated. Constituency offices damaged. Extreme left wing party’s websites inciting a subversive influx of their members into the Labour Party. A shadow chancellor who reduces his already tattered credibility by publicly stooping to verbal abuse and the f word. The Labour Party is currently a joke. All this against a back drop of a newly re-united Tory party with a new PM who uses the rhetoric of Blair and Milliband to reach out to left of centre voters. The ship is sinking and Captain Ahab has lashed himself to the wheel. It is a credit to the PLP that they are fighting to save the Labour Party from it’s inevitable appointment with obscurity.
commented 2016-07-13 10:12:23 +0100
IS THIS THE NEW UNDEMOCRATIC LABOUR NEC IN ACTION?
LEGAL CHALLENGE, MEMBERSHIP CHALLENGE AND LABOUR MPs WITH AN OUNCE OF DECENCY, SHOULD ALSO CHALLENGE, SUCH AN UNDEMOCRATIC DECISION MAKING PROCESS – A REAL SCANDAL!
URGENT CLARIFICATION NEEDED
WHATEVER, THE OUTCOME, JEREMY CORBYN WILL STILL WIN!!!!

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